The Chinese Writing System – Pinyin to Characters

25 Nov

There are two ways to communicate within the Chinese writing system. One way is by use of characters, also known now as formal written Chinese. This is where you draw symbols with a paintbrush or calligraphy pen. There are thousands upon thousands of characters to learn over time. The other way is by Pinyin, also known as Hanyu Pinyin. Pinyin is how people are able to translate Chinese characters, or symbols, into the Roman alphabet for worldwide translation.  Translating Chinese characters to Pinyin is the official way to translate the Chinese language, but Pinyin to characters is also widely done.  Those in the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan (Republic of China) and in Singapore use this method to communicate in writing, and often translate Pinyin to characters because it is used as such.

Translating Pinyin to characters is very popular when it comes to teaching people the standard Chinese language and how to spell Chinese names. It is usually used for foreign publications as well as for computers because it is practically impossible to type Chinese characters into a computer, hence why people use Pinyin when they are typing in Chinese and why translating Pinyin to characters is rather popular.

The History Behind It All

This particular aspect of the Chinese writing system was developed during the 1950’s. It was based on the near the beginning forms of Romanization. The Chinese government published material for the first time right around 1958, even though after it was published it was revised several times. Then in 1982, the International Organization for Standardization implemented this form of the Chinese writing system.  When the International Organization Standardization adopted Pinyin, it became the standard of written Chinese internationally. This aspect of the Chinese writing system was adopted again in 2009 by Taiwan. Shortly after Taiwan adopted Pinyin, it became the new phonetic system.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: